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The Farrah Fawcett-Ayn Rand Connection

June 27th, 2009 by Myrhaf · 7 Comments · Culture

In the months before Farrah Fawcett died Amy Wallace had an email exchange with the actress about Fawcett’s communications with Ayn Rand. Fawcett’s emails show that she was most definitely not the airhead starlet she used to be considered.

She shows insightful conceptual thinking, such as in her thoughts on The Fountainhead.

At the time that Ayn contacted me about Atlas Shrugged, my only real familiarity with her work was the movie version of her previous novel, The Fountainhead, with Gary Cooper. I remember liking the movie because it was unique in that the characters seemed to be the embodiments of ideas as opposed to real flesh and blood people with interests and lives.

Many will think this distinction makes Ayn Rand’s romantic characterization inferior to a naturalistic method. Perhaps Fawcett herself thought so. I would say that by capturing the essence of a character, Ayn Rand shows us the more important philosophic reality rather than the meaningless details of naturalistic characterization. Anyway, that Fawcett was able to see the distinction at all reveals an active mind.

Yes, I think Farrah Fawcett would have been a splendid Dagny. And the late ’70s-early ’80s might have been the last moment Hollywood could done Atlas Shrugged justice. With the increased publicity the 52-year old book is getting as Americans react to Obama’s shock and awe statist bombardment of our liberty, I suspect the movie will now get made. I hope for nothing from the movie but an enormous advertisement for the book. That’s good enough. It might be, as they say, a game changer. If the rest of leftist Hollywood could think in principle the way Fawcett could, they would stay away from an Atlas Shrugged movie for another 52 years.

7 Comments so far ↓

  • Chuck

    I was a huge fan of Farrah Fawcett during her Charlie’s Angels year. She projected such a benevolent sense of life that she was impossible not to like. Much like Marilyn Monroe.

  • Joseph Kellard

    When I was still a newbie to Objectivism, I remember my reaction when I had first heard/read that Ayn Rand’s favorite TV show was Charlie’s Angels. I thought, “What would an intellectual like her find interesting in a low-brow show like Charlie’s Angels?” Perhaps I had yet to read “The Romantic Manifesto”; I don’t recall. But apparently Farrah had the same reaction: “She said she never missed an episode of the show. I remember being surprised and flattered by that. I mean, here was this literary genius praising Angels.”

  • Carlton

    The movie *is* getting made: http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0480239/

    It’s scheduled to release in 2011. I believe The Atlas Society has some connection to it (for better or worse).

  • madmax

    I can’t see AS being made by Hollywood liberals. Well they could make a movie called ‘Atlas Shrugged’ but it will bear no relation to the book. Hollywood only makes anti-totalitarian movies about religious/”right-wing” dictatorships; ie ‘V For Vendetta’. Making a film about a left-wing dictatorship would require the Hollywood left to identify themselves for what they are. There’s no way that’s going to happen.

  • Objectivist’s Angel « Around The Sphere

    […] Myrhaf at The New Clarion: Many will think this distinction makes Ayn Rand’s romantic characterization inferior to a naturalistic method. Perhaps Fawcett herself thought so. I would say that by capturing the essence of a character, Ayn Rand shows us the more important philosophic reality rather than the meaningless details of naturalistic characterization. Anyway, that Fawcett was able to see the distinction at all reveals an active mind. […]

  • Jim May

    anyone remember “Starship Troopers”? Paul Verhoeven is on my personal shit list for that one.

    That’s the worst that could happen to the Atlas movie.

  • Inspector

    Indeed, Jim, that’s the same example I always use on this subject. Probably because I couldn’t think of a more complete and utter butchering of a book. Verhoeven somehow managed to *completely reverse* the theme of that book in making his movie.

    I expect the same treatment for Atlas.